Tag: research studies

October 8, 2018

World Mental Health Day (October 10) and National Depression Screening Day (October 11) are both held annually during Mental Illness Awareness Week in October. Both days are recognized globally in an effort to raise public awareness of behavioral and mental health issues, working to reduce stigma, and changing overall attitudes about mental health.

The 2018 campaign for World Mental Health Day is focused on Young People and Mental Health in a Changing World. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), half of all mental illness begins at the age of 14, and most remain undetected and untreated, with depression being the third leading cause. Suicide is the second cause of death among those between 15 and 29, with harmful use of alcohol and illicit drugs being a major issue. The goal of this year’s campaign is to bring attention to the issues youths and young adults are facing in the world today and begin the conversation around what they need in order to grow up healthy, happy and resilient.

World Mental Health Day was observed for the first time back on October 10, 1992. It was started as an annual activity of the World Federation for Mental Health by the Deputy Secretary General Richard Hunter. Back then, the day had no specific theme or topic and the goal was to promote mental health advocacy and to educate the public on relevant issues. The day is officially commemorated annually on October 10th.

National Depression Screening Day was pioneered in 1990 by Screening for Mental Health (SMH). It was the first voluntary, mental health screening initiative. The day began as an effort to reach individuals across the country to help educate them on mental health issues and connect them with support services.

ActivMed will be offering FREE DEPRESSION SCREENINGS during the month of October in recognition of World Mental Health Day. If you or someone you love has been experiencing depression symptoms, you may request an appointment by CLICKING HERE.

Research studies for potential new depression treatments are also enrolling now. If you have been diagnosed with depression and are unhappy with your current treatment, you may be eligible. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, CLICK HERE.

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August 21, 2018

Clinical trials play a key role in helping to advance medical research. Clinical trials are scientific studies that ultimately aim to find better ways to prevent, treat, and diagnose diseases. If you have ever considered volunteering to participate in a clinical research trial, it’s important to understand how clinical trials work.

Clinical trials are done in different phases. Each phase has different criteria and a different purpose.

  • Phase I studies are meant to assess the safety of a drug or device and usually include 20-100 volunteers. About 70% of drugs will pass this phase.
  • Phase II studies are designed to test the effectiveness of a drug or device, while continuing to monitor and assess safety. Several hundred volunteers may take part in phase II trials and they can last from several months to two years. About one-third of drugs successfully complete phase I and phase II studies.
  • Phase III studies involve several hundred to several thousand volunteers. The purpose is to test effectiveness and to monitor for any adverse reactions. About 25-30% of drugs will make to the next phase.
  • Phase IV studies test the safety and effectiveness of treatment and carried out once the drug or device has been approved by the FDA.

No matter the phase, each clinical trial is led by a Principal Investigator, or PI. The PI, who is often a board-certified physician, works with a medical team and follows a master plan called a protocol. The protocol explains detailed information about what will be done during the clinical trial. Even if the same study is being conducted in a different part of the country, the exact same protocol will be followed.

Before deciding whether or not to participate in a research study, volunteers are provided with key information that explains the details of the study. This is called the informed consent process. Informed consent is more than just signing a document, it involves providing appropriate time for potential participants to ask questions and discuss any questions and concerns before deciding to participate.  Throughout the study, informed consent is maintained with participants through the disclosure of any newly discovered potential risks, and the ongoing disclosure of information as the research progresses.

Choosing to participate in a clinical trial is a very personal decision. Participating may give you the opportunity to access potential new treatment options and give you a better understanding of your condition. ActivMed understands the importance of clinical research and the value that participants bring to the advancement of medical knowledge.  ActivMed is currently enrolling for studies in a variety of conditions. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more about how you or someone you love may qualify to participate in a clinical research study at ActivMed, click HERE.

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July 23, 2018

Gluten-free diets have become a popular trend over recent years. Whether it’s in hopes to boost energy, lose weight, treat some health ailment, or just to improve general overall health. According to an article in JAMA Internal Medicine,  while gluten-free diets are on the rise, celiac disease diagnoses continue to remain steady with little fluctuation year to year.

While that’s not to say those following gluten-free diets don’t have a gluten sensitivity, a gluten sensitivity is not the same as celiac disease, and would not be detectable in a blood test. Living with celiac disease is much more than just living a gluten-free lifestyle. Eating gluten triggers an immune response in the small intestine and can lead to some pretty undesirable symptoms. Let’s explore a little further.

People with celiac disease can’t eat gluten. If you’re wondering what exactly gluten is, it’s a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The immune response that happens in the small intestine when gluten is consumed can damage the lining of the intestine over time, and prevent absorption of nutrients.

This damage can also cause symptoms like: abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, weight loss, and even anemia. Although, many people with celiac disease don’t have any symptoms.

Currently, the only treatment for those with celiac disease is a strict, 100% gluten-free diet to help manage symptoms. ActivMed is currently enrolling in studies for potential new treatment options. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with celiac disease, you may be eligible to participate in a research study. Qualified candidates who and participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, CLICK HERE.

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July 10, 2018

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a chronic condition in which a person has uncontrollable recurring thoughts (obsessions) that lead to compulsive behaviors. OCD isn’t just about habits like nail biting, or always thinking a certain way. This disorder is much more serious and can interfere with all aspects of life such as work, school, and personal relationships.

1 in 40 U.S. adults suffers from OCD. According to the World Health Organization, OCD is one of the top 20 causes of illness-related disability.

Genetics play a role. People with first-degree relatives – think parent, child, sibling – who have OCD are at a higher risk for developing OCD themselves.

Most people are diagnosed by about age 19. While an OCD diagnosis typically occurs by age 19, disease onset after age 35 can happen. Boys typically have an earlier age of onset than girls.

How is OCD diagnosed? OCD is diagnosed when obsessions and compulsions consume an hour or more each day, cause significant distress, and interfere with daily functioning at work or school, in family relationships or with normal routines.

Symptoms of OCD vary widely depending upon the individual and the situation. These may include: fear of germs, fear of harm/illness/death, religious fears, urges related to numbers, discarding items, excessive doubt, urges to have everything “just right,” sexual fears, the list goes on. While the majority of people with OCD are able to function reasonably well, when OCD symptoms escalate to the point that they interfere with basic life functions – it’s time to consider seeking help.

Recognizing that you need help is the first step to help managing your OCD symptoms. If you or someone you love is struggling with OCD, ActivMed is currently enrolling in studies for those seeking new treatment options. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for an obsessive-compulsive disorder study, click HERE.

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April 16, 2018

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes glucose, a kind of sugar in your blood. It is the most common form of diabetes, with over 30 million people suffering from this condition in the United States alone.

If you have type 2 diabetes, your body may not use insulin properly, your body may not produce enough insulin, or insulin receptors may not be working correctly. While diabetes is a widespread disease, not everything you hear about the condition is true.

 

 

Myth: If you’re overweight, you will develop diabetes.

Fact: While being overweight is definitely a risk factor for developing diabetes, it’s not the only factor. Things like age and family history also play key roles. Many overweight people never develop diabetes and many people with diabetes are normal weight or slightly overweight.

Myth: Diabetes isn’t a very serious disease.

Fact: Diabetes nearly doubles your risk of having a heart attack. It also causes more deaths per year than AIDS and breast cancer combined.

Myth: You get diabetes by eating too much sugar.

Fact: Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. However, being overweight is a risk factor for developing diabetes and any diet high in calories will attribute to weight gain. The link between myth and fact here gets a little blurry because research has actually shown that drinking an abundance of sugary drinks or consuming larger amount of alcohol on a daily basis,  is linked to in increases in glucose levels.  The American Diabetes Association recommends that people should avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes.

Myth: You’ll know if you have diabetes by your symptoms.

Fact: Type 2 diabetes often goes undiagnosed because it can have few or no symptoms, especially when it first develops. It is estimated that out of the 30 million people that suffer from type 2 diabetes, over 7 million are undiagnosed.

More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older is struggling with type 2 diabetes. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, a research study may be an option. ActivMed is currently seeking participants for several current and upcoming studies. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, click HERE.

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