Category: COVID-19

June 17, 2020
COVID-19 Study Now Enrolling

We are excited to announce that we are NOW ENROLLING for a new COVID-19 Observational Study! 

COVID-19 Study Now Enrolling

This study is for people who have had a COVID-19 test, regardless of the result, to evaluate the accuracy of an investigational antibody test.

As it is an observational study, it only requires ONE VISIT to our clinic.

To learn more about this study, please call

978-655-7155.

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June 15, 2020

Stress is a way of life these days, it seems. COVID-19 has effectively changed the way we live our lives, at least for the foreseeable future. Most of us know that stress is not good for the body, but do you know how it impacts our health? Prolonged exposure to stress changes the way our brains function. To dive deeper, it reverts to its primitive functions that help us sense and respond to danger. We become faster at solving quick issues but lose the ability to plan or deal effectively with complex problems. Stress doesn’t have to run your life. With a little basic care and healthful changes, you too can embrace the stress.

Stress Relief Tips

There is so much that is beyond our control, and the truth is that stress is ever-present. Fortunately, there are things you can learn to help manage how you react to stress and help you relax your brain.

  • Meditation– Meditation can help relax your mind, and help you become less reactive to stress triggers.
  • Restructure Stress Response– Cognitive restructuring is a technique that changes the habitual thinking patterns that trigger your stress response.
  • Stress Management– Learning more about stress, stress management, and what triggers your stress response will help you feel more confident to handle what life throws at you.
  • Confide in Someone You Trust– Talk things out with a trusted loved one instead of staying in your thoughts. Surround yourself with those who will help you identify you are stressed, and when to take action.

Brain Exercises

Taking care of your brain is important at any age. Engaging in regular brain exercises helps improve memory and focus so you can keep up with daily life. In our later years, brain changes begin to affect memory, and these activities become more and more important. Jigsaw puzzles, dancing, learning a new skill, and meditation are some ways you can challenge your mind.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. The program’s focus is on providing brain health education, resources, and tools for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. One of the ways they do this is by helping to raise money for the vital research needed to detect, treat, and eventually cure these conditions through clinical research studies.

ActivMed Practices & Research can help you take charge of your brain health. You can get involved by participating in one of the Alzheimer’s research studies at our Methuen location or take advantage of our telehealth memory screens. To learn more about our free telehealth memory screens, call the Methuen office at (978) 655-7155 or by click here.

 

References:

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/coronavirus-covid19-stress-brain

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-to-relax-your-mind-3144475

https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/brain-exercises#focus

 

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May 19, 2020

If you have survived a stroke or heart attack, your chances of having another one are 1 in 4. The good news is, up to 80% can be prevented through managing chronic conditions, and lifestyle modifications. May is American Stroke Month, and the 2020 initiative is “One is Enough” which focuses on preventing another stroke. Not all risk factors are within your control, but for the ones we can control, it is time to make changes, even in the midst of COVID-19.

Chronic Conditions and Stroke Risk

 

 

A stroke happens when a clot or rupture blocks blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the brain. This disruption in the flow of these vital nutrients results in the death of brain cells. Depending on the severity of the stroke, and where it occurs in the brain, the resulting damage can vary. Stroke sufferers can have paralysis, speech or language problems, memory loss, and changes in behavior.

Several risk factors increase your risk of stroke. Family history, age, and gender are factors that no one can change. However, managing chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes play a vital role in prevention and reoccurrence. Diabetes and heart disease impairs your body’s ability to effectively transport oxygen and the critical nutrients we mentioned earlier to your brain. By working with your doctor and following their plan to manage these conditions, you can reduce your risk of stroke. Eating a healthy diet, staying active at least 150 minutes a week, and living tobacco-free are some of the lifestyle recommendations the American Stroke Association suggests in addition to the management of chronic conditions.

Hidden Dangers of Stress and the Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken the world by storm, changing life as we knew it. In addition to fears of contracting the virus, many lost their jobs and businesses, creating a financial and emotional strain few have seen before. During these unprecedented times, stress levels have understandably risen. However, continued stress over long periods can increase your risk of developing certain heart diseases such as high blood pressure if not managed. High blood pressure is the number 1 controllable risk factor for stroke.

Know the Signs

The American Stroke Association uses the acronym “FAST” to help recognize the symptoms of a stroke to get immediate medical attention. It may mean the difference between recovery and disability, so knowing the signs is vital:

  • F (Face Drooping)- Does one side of the face droop, or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven or lopsided?
  • A (Arm Weakness)- Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • S (Speech)- Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence.
  • T (Time to call 9-1-1)- If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.

 

ActivMed offers free health screenings for blood glucose, blood pressure, and more. To learn more, visit our website here.

During COVID-19, ActivMed Practices and Research is committed to ensuring the safety of our patients and staff. Click here for our latest COVID-19 facility updates.

References:

https://www.stroke.org/en/life-after-stroke/preventing-another-stroke

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