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Author: Ryan Speer

Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire Come enjoy an afternoon with us!   The Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is a welcoming place where people living with dementia, along with their care partners and family members, come together for a casual social gathering each month. Spend an afternoon enjoying interesting conversation with new friends.   The Alzheimer’s Cafe happens on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 2-4pm at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. Refreshments are served.   No reservations necessary. Free of charge, but donations are welcome. For more information, please contact Paula Rais at 603-742-2002 or email paula@childrens-museum.org www.childrens-museum.org

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Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire Come enjoy an afternoon with us!   The Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is a welcoming place where people living with dementia, along with their care partners and family members, come together for a casual social gathering each month. Spend an afternoon enjoying interesting conversation with new friends.   The Alzheimer’s Cafe happens on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 2-4pm at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. Refreshments are served.   No reservations necessary. Free of charge, but donations are welcome. For more information, please contact Paula Rais at 603-742-2002 or email paula@childrens-museum.org www.childrens-museum.org

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Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire Come enjoy an afternoon with us!   The Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is a welcoming place where people living with dementia, along with their care partners and family members, come together for a casual social gathering each month. Spend an afternoon enjoying interesting conversation with new friends.   The Alzheimer’s Cafe happens on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 2-4pm at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. Refreshments are served.   No reservations necessary. Free of charge, but donations are welcome. For more information, please contact Paula Rais at 603-742-2002 or email paula@childrens-museum.org www.childrens-museum.org

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Mind & Memory Laughter Yoga Cafe with Julie Becker Twice Monthly on Thursdays * Nourishing snacks and infused waters provided 10:30-11:30am before Yoga session June 20 & 27 July 18 & 25 August 1 & 15 The Atrium at Drum Hill is creating an engaging environment through movement and laughter. For those affected by dementia, carrying on a conversation can be difficult, following sequences is a challenge and not all people move at the same speed. Through our mind and memory cafe, caregivers can interact with their loved ones in a space and way that isn’t forced. They can smile, laugh, move and just be with family. We invite you to join us as we help provide moments of laughter, hope, and engagement. Julie Becker is a nursing student at Fairfield University. She has been practicing laughter yoga for over 6 years and is a certified laughter yoga instructor Julie would describe laughter yoga as “a type of yoga based on the belief that voluntary yoga provides physiological and psychological benefits coupled with breathing techniques that work to relieve stress and uplift any mood.” Laughter is the best medicine!   For more information or to RSVP, please call 978.934.0000 or email sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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Mind & Memory Laughter Yoga Cafe with Julie Becker Twice Monthly on Thursdays * Nourishing snacks and infused waters provided 10:30-11:30am before Yoga session June 20 & 27 July 18 & 25 August 1 & 15 The Atrium at Drum Hill is creating an engaging environment through movement and laughter. For those affected by dementia, carrying on a conversation can be difficult, following sequences is a challenge and not all people move at the same speed. Through our mind and memory cafe, caregivers can interact with their loved ones in a space and way that isn’t forced. They can smile, laugh, move and just be with family. We invite you to join us as we help provide moments of laughter, hope, and engagement. Julie Becker is a nursing student at Fairfield University. She has been practicing laughter yoga for over 6 years and is a certified laughter yoga instructor Julie would describe laughter yoga as “a type of yoga based on the belief that voluntary yoga provides physiological and psychological benefits coupled with breathing techniques that work to relieve stress and uplift any mood.” Laughter is the best medicine!   For more information or to RSVP, please call 978.934.0000 or email sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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Mind & Memory Laughter Yoga Cafe with Julie Becker Twice Monthly on Thursdays * Nourishing snacks and infused waters provided 10:30-11:30am before Yoga session June 20 & 27 July 18 & 25 August 1 & 15 The Atrium at Drum Hill is creating an engaging environment through movement and laughter. For those affected by dementia, carrying on a conversation can be difficult, following sequences is a challenge and not all people move at the same speed. Through our mind and memory cafe, caregivers can interact with their loved ones in a space and way that isn’t forced. They can smile, laugh, move and just be with family. We invite you to join us as we help provide moments of laughter, hope, and engagement. Julie Becker is a nursing student at Fairfield University. She has been practicing laughter yoga for over 6 years and is a certified laughter yoga instructor Julie would describe laughter yoga as “a type of yoga based on the belief that voluntary yoga provides physiological and psychological benefits coupled with breathing techniques that work to relieve stress and uplift any mood.” Laughter is the best medicine!   For more information or to RSVP, please call 978.934.0000 or email sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire Come enjoy an afternoon with us!   The Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is a welcoming place where people living with dementia, along with their care partners and family members, come together for a casual social gathering each month. Spend an afternoon enjoying interesting conversation with new friends.   The Alzheimer’s Cafe happens on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 2-4pm at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. Refreshments are served.   No reservations necessary. Free of charge, but donations are welcome. For more information, please contact Paula Rais at 603-742-2002 or email paula@childrens-museum.org www.childrens-museum.org

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Mind & Memory Laughter Yoga Cafe with Julie Becker Twice Monthly on Thursdays * Nourishing snacks and infused waters provided 10:30-11:30am before Yoga session June 20 & 27 July 18 & 25 August 1 & 15 The Atrium at Drum Hill is creating an engaging environment through movement and laughter. For those affected by dementia, carrying on a conversation can be difficult, following sequences is a challenge and not all people move at the same speed. Through our mind and memory cafe, caregivers can interact with their loved ones in a space and way that isn’t forced. They can smile, laugh, move and just be with family. We invite you to join us as we help provide moments of laughter, hope, and engagement. Julie Becker is a nursing student at Fairfield University. She has been practicing laughter yoga for over 6 years and is a certified laughter yoga instructor Julie would describe laughter yoga as “a type of yoga based on the belief that voluntary yoga provides physiological and psychological benefits coupled with breathing techniques that work to relieve stress and uplift any mood.” Laughter is the best medicine!   For more information or to RSVP, please call 978.934.0000 or email sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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Dementia Live off¬ers a unique inside-out understanding of dementia and aging. Participants will gain a heightened awareness of the challenges faced by those who live with dementia. Learn tips and tools to improve communications and care. Please allow two hours for this engaging and remarkable experience. Two CEU credits will be available to Certified Case Managers, Social Workers and Registered Nurses. Wednesday, July 17 5 to 7 p.m. Please RSVP by Friday, July 12 by calling 978-912-9250 or click here. Wingate Residences at Haverhill 10 Residences Way Haverhill, MA 01830 978-912-9250  

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Join our community with Linda Amir, Director of Senior Financial Solutions at Benchmark. She leads the Benchmark Financial Concierge providing families information and access to alternative financial resources to help pay for senior living. You or your loved one may be eligible for a Veteran Aid & Attendance pension, or maybe a short-term “bridge loan” is right for you. Come learn about these important financial options. Lunch will be served. Sandy Becker 978-934-0000 sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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July 1, 2019

Molluscum (muh-luhs-kum) contagiosum (kən-tā-jē-ō-səm) is a skin disease caused by a virus that spreads easily from person to person.

About seven weeks after a person is exposed to the virus, around 10 to 20 small, dome-shaped growths begin to appear on the skin (occasionally, the bumps may take months to appear).  They are generally located on the face, armpits, neck, arms, or hands. The bumps are painless, but some can itch. The surface of the bumps initially is smooth and waxy or pearly.  They are flesh-colored or pink, although as the body’s immune system begins to fight the virus, the bumps will turn red. Once the bumps are present, you are contagious.

How it Spreads

The virus spreads by either direct skin-to-skin contact with someone who has the virus, or by contact with something infected with the virus.

  • Skin-to-Skin Contact – When your skin comes in contact with someone who has the virus, such as when hugging or during contact sports or sexual contact
  • Objects Infected with the Virus – Anything infected with the virus, such as towels, clothing or toys. Wrestlers and gymnasts can get it from infected gym mats

Once a person has the virus, they can spread it from one part of their body to another. This is done by scratching or picking the bumps, then touching another uninfected area.

Who Gets It?

Children are most impacted by molluscum contagiosum, although people of any age can be affected. Certain climates, a weakened immune system, and other skin conditions can all increase the risk of getting the virus, as well as the severity of it.

  • Climate – The virus thrives in a warm, humid environment
  • Weakened Immune System – Those with a weakened immune system, due to AIDS or cancer, for example, are at a higher risk to get the virus, and can develop a more severe form of it (many more bumps)
  • Current Skin Conditions – Having atopic dermatitis increases the risk and the severity of the virus (many more bumps)

Treatment

The highly contagious nature of molluscum contagiosum, paired with how it can mimic other skin conditions, makes it important to get a diagnosis from a Board-certified dermatologist.  After a person is diagnosed with molluscum contagiosum, the bumps will usually go away on their own without treatment within 12 to18 months, although they can last longer.

Treatment, however, prevents the virus from spreading to other parts of the body.  It also prevents spread to other people, which is especially important for people with compromised immune systems.

Stopping the Spread

If you have been diagnosed with molluscum contagiosum, you are the key in preventing its spread to yourself or others. Remember, if the bumps are present, you are contagious.

Here are some ways you can directly prevent the spread of the virus:

  • Not sharing items that have been in contact with your skin
  • Avoiding sex and other skin-to-skin contact when bumps are present
  • Refraining from scratching or picking bumps
  • Getting diagnosed and completing any prescribed treatment

At ActivMed Practices & Research, we are committed to not only working with patients to find current treatments that will deliver the most impactful results, but also to working to develop new treatment options through clinical studies.

If you or your child has been diagnosed with molluscum contagiosum, ActivMed Practices & Research currently has an enrolling study for those seeking new treatment options. Qualified volunteers who participate in the study will receive study-related care at no cost.  There is also compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a research study on molluscum contagiosum, please click HERE.

Reference

https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/contagious-skin-diseases/molluscum-contagiosum

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June 27, 2019

What is the Difference?

Atopic dermatitis and eczema are words that are often used interchangeably.  It can be perplexing to think that although there are some similarities between the two conditions, they are different. To start, let’s look at the two individually.

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is defined by itchy, red rashes that typically appear on the joint areas of the body like elbows, knees, and even the neck. Symptoms can include flaky or scaly patches, dry skin, itching, and sores that may weep. Symptoms appear in “flare ups” and can improve or worsen over time.

Eczema

Eczema is the name of a group of skin conditions that are characterized by itchy and inflamed patches of skin. It is often seen in babies and young children, first appearing on their faces, but it can affect anyone at any age.

Eczema is classified into different types.  Some of the most common, along with their symptoms, include:

  • Atopic Dermatitis – Flaky or scaly patches, dry skin, itching, and sores that may weep
  • Contact Dermatitis – Red rash, itching, burning, stinging, and blisters with liquid
  • Seborrheic Dermatitis – Scaly patches, dandruff, red skin, and rashes located in oily areas

The Answer

Once you see the words separated, it’s easy to see why both words are being used interchangeably. Simply put, atopic dermatitis is a form of eczema. If you take away the “atopic” part, we are left with dermatitis. Dermatitis and eczema both are inflammations of the skin, so these two are essentially one and the same.

The prefix “atopic” means that “there is typically a genetic tendency toward allergic disease,” according to The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The “atopic” part classifies the dermatitis into a category of eczema.

No matter which term you use, it’s not entirely wrong. Eczema and atopic dermatitis are used in the same context so often, most people never know the difference. Now that you do know the differences, you can begin to use the correct terms, and even help others who are not sure!

At ActivMed, we are committed to not only working with patients to find current treatments that will deliver the most impactful results, but also working to develop new treatment options through clinical studies.

If you or someone you love is struggling with atopic dermatitis, ActivMed currently has enrolling studies for those seeking new treatment options. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost.  There is also compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, please click HERE.

 

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health/difference-between-eczema-and-dermatitis

https://www.healthline.com/health/eczema

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Mind & Memory Laughter Yoga Cafe with Julie Becker Twice Monthly on Thursdays * Nourishing snacks and infused waters provided 10:30-11:30am before Yoga session June 20 & 27 July 18 & 25 August 1 & 15 The Atrium at Drum Hill is creating an engaging environment through movement and laughter. For those affected by dementia, carrying on a conversation can be difficult, following sequences is a challenge and not all people move at the same speed. Through our mind and memory cafe, caregivers can interact with their loved ones in a space and way that isn’t forced. They can smile, laugh, move and just be with family. We invite you to join us as we help provide moments of laughter, hope, and engagement. Julie Becker is a nursing student at Fairfield University. She has been practicing laughter yoga for over 6 years and is a certified laughter yoga instructor Julie would describe laughter yoga as “a type of yoga based on the belief that voluntary yoga provides physiological and psychological benefits coupled with breathing techniques that work to relieve stress and uplift any mood.” Laughter is the best medicine!   For more information or to RSVP, please call 978.934.0000 or email sbecker@benchmarkquality.com  

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June 25, 2019

CatiesCloset Clothing Drive

WE’RE HOSTING A CLOTHING DRIVE

FOR  KIDS  PREK-12 LIVING  IN POVERTY

August 1 – August 28

URGENT NEEDS:
Youth Clothing size 2 – 20 : jeans , sweats , sweatshirts , tees Youth Toiletries: body wash, shampoo, toothpaste
Youth & Teen New Socks & Underwear

Donations will be collected in the lobby of our Methuen, Beverly, and Portsmouth locations

Catie’s Closet is a local non-profit organization dedicated to helping kids go to school & stay in school. With the help of donors, clothing and toiletries are provided at no-charge within 80 schools in MA & NH, including Boston.

WWW.CATIESCLOSET.ORG | EID: 27 – 2531953

 

CONTACT: CHRISTINE MCINTOSH

CMCINTOSH@ACTIVMEDRESEARCH. COM

 

 

https://www.catiescloset.org/

 

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On behalf of the Veterans Northeast Outreach Center, the Bedford VA Medical Center would like to invite you to our Annual Homeless Veteran Stand Down & Outreach Fair.   This year’s event will be on Tuesday, June 25st from 10am to 2pm at the Veterans Northeast Outreach Center, 10 Reed Street, Haverhill, MA. Ample parking available!   We would love to have you join us as we gather in support all our Veterans in need.   To RSVP and reserve a spot for an information table, e-mail, pat.collins@va.gov or call Pat Collins at (781) 687-2374. Please RSVP by Tuesday, June 18th.

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June 21, 2019

 

We held an afternoon Tea to recognize our Citizen Scientist Award nominees on June 20, 2019.

The Global Alzheimer’s Platform Foundation (GAP) created a first-of-its-kind award to celebrate Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial participants. The only way to find treatments and cures for Alzheimer’s is through clinical trials and these volunteers make that research possible.

As a GAP-Net site we have submitted two nominations for the Citizen Scientists® award. From all the nominations across the U.S. and Canada, three selected winners will be recognized at the annual UsAgainstAlzheimer’s National Summit in Washington, DC, held in the October.

The Mayor of the City of Methuen, MA, Jim Jajuga, joined us to celebrate these nominees and to present his own Mayor Citation, in recognition of their participation. 

Mayor Jajuga also spoke about the partnership between the city of Methuen and ActivMed. We are working together to make Methuen, Dementia Friendly and Age Friendly.

Congratulations to Robert Brown and Sharon Sundberg on being chosen for this award! We commend your efforts to support local research and participate in a trial. 

Robert Brown was nominated for the Champion award. By participating in the Walks to End Alzheimer’s and working with Veterans in the community, he is bringing awareness to the community. He and his wife always have a smile and a joke ready, and have become part of the ActivMed family.

Sharon Sundberg was nominated for the Cornerstone award. Sharon has made extraordinary efforts to participate, traveling nearly three hours to our site for each visit! Her goal is to help future generations through her participation.

Thank you both for your commitment and participation from all of us at ActivMed!

 

Global Alzheimer's Platform Foundation GAP

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  Kick off the start of Summer with a Luau at Stone Hill! We’re inviting our professional partners to get to know us and each other while enjoying a Stone Hill signature cocktail and small bites. Commemorate the evening with friends in our photo booth, provided by Boston Selfies.

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Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire Come enjoy an afternoon with us!   The Alzheimer’s Cafe at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is a welcoming place where people living with dementia, along with their care partners and family members, come together for a casual social gathering each month. Spend an afternoon enjoying interesting conversation with new friends.   The Alzheimer’s Cafe happens on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 2-4pm at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. Refreshments are served.   No reservations necessary. Free of charge, but donations are welcome. For more information, please contact Paula Rais at 603-742-2002 or email paula@childrens-museum.org www.childrens-museum.org

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As a Global Alzheimer’s Platform Foundation (GAP) site, ActivMed is proud to announce that we are participating in this year’s Citizen Scientist Awards program. We have 2 study participants who have accepted our nomination to this national award. During Citizen Scientist Week, June 17-21, we will hold an afternoon Tea to award the nominations, recognizing and celebrating their clinical trial participation. 3 national winners will be selected from the 70 GAP sites in the U.S. and Canada, and be recognized at the annual Us Against Alzheimer’s National Summit in Washington, DC in October. Our event will be June 20th in our Learning Center from. Mayor Jajuga from Methuen will be here to present the awards, and issue a Mayor Citation of Recognition as well.   https://globalalzplatform.org/awards/  

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June 19, 2019

Not all Headaches are Created Equal

Do you ever feel like you are being stabbed in the head with an icepick? Well, believe it or not, that is NOT a kind of migraine people can suffer from. When you think about headaches, often, our minds drift to migraines. However, there are different kinds, and we are going to show you just what they are.

Below are some headache and migraine symptoms and their names. Having a list of the differences can help you determine your next course of action, as the treatments for a headache versus a migraine can vary.

Common Types of Migraines:

  • Migraine Aura Also called a “Complicated Migraine”. When you experience a series of sensory or visual changes (aura) before or during a migraine. These can last anywhere from 10-30 minutes. Check out this video of what that can look like!
  • Hemiplegic Migraine- Weakness on one side of the body also with the visual aura symptoms. This migraine can resemble a stroke.
  • Retinal Migraine-When you temporarily lose vision in one eye. This can last anywhere from a minute, to a month. Although scary, this is usually fully reversible.

Common Types of Headaches:

  • Icepick HeadacheWhen you experience primarily a stabbing sensation, delivering intense, sharp, pain. This can last anywhere from 5-30 seconds.
  • Cluster Headache- These start with a burning sensation around and above the eyes and temples. This can move all the way to the back of the head and trigger other symptoms. Red, swollen eyes, as well as a runny nose can happen along with these.
  • Cervicogenic Headache-This is when the pain in your head is caused by the pain in your neck. The pain can originate from neck pain, or a lesion on the spine.

Whether it is a headache or a migraine, always consult with your doctor to find the right treatment for you. Your provider will take your family history, have some tests run that may include blood work, and any imaging that may need to be completed. Then, you can be on your way to prevention and relief through the many options available to treat migraines and headaches.

At ActivMed, we are committed not only to working with patients to find current treatments that will deliver the most impactful results, but also in working to develop new treatment options through clinical studies.

If you or someone you love is struggling with migraines, ActivMed currently has enrolling studies for those seeking new treatment options. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, click HERE.

 

References:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/symptoms-causes/syc-20360201

https://americanmigrainefoundation.org/resource-library/what-type-of-headache-do-you-have/

 

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Artis Senior Living of Reading Presents… Alzheimer’s Disease… Diabetes of the Brain? Dash & Dine Presented by Scherrie Keating RN, BSN, CDE, CDP Founder, Diabetes Kare Consulting LLC Producer, Host- Talk Me Healthy Show Tuesday, June 18th 4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Registration & Refreshments 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Presentation and Dinner to Go   Everyone has heard of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, BUT have you heard of Type 3 Diabetes? Type 3 Diabetes, at term coined by Researchers Suanne de la Monte, MD and Jack R. Wands, MD., is becoming known as a new form of Diabetes. Type 3 Diabetes is causing Alzheimer’s Disease- like pathological changes in the brain leading to cognitive impairments. Attend this program, increase your understanding of insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s Disease. Hear the latest cutting-edge research linking brain insulin resistance to the hallmark abnormalities of Alzheimer’s Disease, potential treatment options and lifestyle changes showing promise in improving cognitive function in patients with early disease.   1.o CE will be available for Social Workers & Nurses Please RSVP by Monday, June 17th to Reading@artismgmt.com or 781.872.1907

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June 17, 2019

We had a great time at the Andover Bike Rodeo & Community Wellness Fair.

The kids learned bike safety, and parents learned about various health topics.

Laura & Karina from our Methuen site helped raise awareness about clinical research and helped people sign up for Free Health Screens.

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The All American at Kingston Invites you to our Holy Grail Professional Mixer     RSVP: Debra Green @ 603-347-5522 The All American Assisted Living Kingston, NH www.allamericanal.com  

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June 12, 2019

Over 400 people came out to learn about dementia care from Teepa Snow! Our CEO, Terry Stubbs, had a great time interacting with senior care providers and sharing information about the clinical research we do at ActivMed.

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In-person training with Teepa Snow Teepa Snow, an occupational therapist with forty years of clinical practice experience, is one of the world’s leading educators on dementia and the care that accompanies it. In 2005, she founded Positive Approach to Care® (PAC), a company that provides dementia care training, services, and products around the world. Senior Helpers and Community Partners Session “Sorting out the Three D’s: Delirium, Depression and Dementia” 9:00am – 10:30am Community Partners Session “Using a Positive Approach to Care” 11:00am – 12:00pm Community Partners and Members Session “Navigating the Journey of Dementia” 2:00pm – 4:00pm Register Today https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-day-with-teepa-snow-june-7-2019-registration-5901741267?discount-CMTY   Sponsored by Senior Helpers®

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May 23, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teepa Snow, an occupational therapist with forty years of clinical practice experience, is one of the world’s leading educators on dementia and the care that accompanies it. In 2005, she founded Positive Approach@to Care (PAC), a company that provides dementia care training, services and products around the world.

Friday, June 7th

Best Western Inn & Conference Center 815 Lafayette Road, Hampton, N.H.

 

Senior Helpers and Community Partners Session

“Sorting out the Three D’s: Delirium, Depression and Dementia”

9:00am – 10:30am

Community Partners Session

“Using a Positive Approach to Care”

11:00am – 12:00pm

Community Partners and Members Session

“Navigating the Journey of Dementia”

2:00pm — 4:00pm

 

Register Today

https://www.eventbrite.cqm/e/a-daywith-teepa-snow-june-7-2Q19-registration-5901741267?discount=CMTY

MUST REGISTER IN ADVANCE,

NO DAY-OF REGISTRATION

Sponsored by Senior Helpers®

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Posted in Events

Join us at Prospect House for Martini and Massage Night Mingle with other professionals while enjoying Martinis & Massages Wednesday May 22nd 2019 4:30pm- 5:00pm for Cocktails 5:00pm- 7:00pm for Massages Space is limited! Please RSVP by May 15th To Regina Guardino, Marketing Director 781-853-0005 or rguardino@hallkeen.com Prospect House 420 Reservoir Ave Revere, MA 02151

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May 22, 2019

Do you have – trouble coming up with a word or a name? – trouble remembering important dates or events? – trouble recalling what you just read? – Problems losing or misplacing things? If you said “yes” to any of the above, consider having a FREE, confidential memory screening

ActivMed will be on-site at the

Salisbury Senior Center offering

Free Memory Screenings

July 31st 10am – 2pm

43 Lafayette Road

Salisbury, MA 01952

978.462.2412

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Posted in Events
May 22, 2019

Our CEO, Terr Stubbs, will be speaking at the Andover Rotary Club  June 28, 2019 at the Lanam Club- Andover

Terry Stubbs image

ActivMed Practices & Research, Inc.
CEO and President

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Posted in Events
May 21, 2019

June 4, 2019

Our CEO, Terry Stubbs, will be speaking at Wingate Healthcare in Haverhill, MA

 

 

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May 21, 2019

Eczema flare ups can really get under your skin (pun intended). So, learning what can cause a flare up (worsening of symptoms) is a vital step in reducing the number of reoccurrences.

What is Eczema?

Eczema is a group of skin conditions that causes the skin to become red, itchy, and inflamed. The medical term is Atopic Dermatitis. It is estimated that over 30 million Americans suffer from eczema each year.

No one knows what causes eczema to develop for a person. Research has shown that people with eczema tend to have an overactive immune system. Research also shows that some people have a mutation in the gene that produces Filaggrin. Filaggrin is a protein that helps our bodies maintain a healthy protective layer (skin).

Flare Causes:

Below is a list of common items that can cause a flare up. Knowing these potential culprits can help you make different choices in your product purchases and daily activities.

  • Temperature- With the summer sun quickly approaching, it is important to note that your skin may not like getting hot and sweaty. Even taking too hot of a bath has been listed as a flare up.
  • Hold the Irritants, Please! Anything from the perfumes in hand soap, to the dyes in your laundry detergent can cause your eczema to flare. Paraphenylene-diamine, Formaldehyde, and Cocamidopropyl betaine are ingredients in household cleaners, shampoos, and dyes in certain fabrics that have been linked to eczema flare ups.
  • Stress- Stress can affect your body drastically. Increases in stress levels can cause flareups.

Eczema Treatments:

In the event of a flareup, there are many treatment options available from over the counter or prescription topical and oral medications. Consult with your doctor or Dermatologist about your best options.

At ActivMed, we are committed not only to working with patients to find current treatments that will deliver the most impactful results, but also in working to develop new treatment options through clinical studies.

If you or someone you love is struggling with eczema, ActivMed currently has enrolling studies for those seeking new treatment options. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, click HERE

References:

https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/

https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/causes-and-triggers-of-eczema/

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Morning for Me: Take a break and join us to learn about memory loss and aging concerns. The 4th annual event presented by Merrimack Valley Alzheimer’s Association Community Partnership   Free for Caregivers- Breakfast provided Information and resources, Relaxation activities, Raffle prizes Featured Speakers: Dr. Michael Alosco Susan Antkowiak Dr. Michael Alosco is currently Assistant Professor of neurology at BU School of Medicine. Dr. Alosco’s research focuses on risk factors and biomarkers of neurodegenerative conditions, with a focus on Alzheimer’s Disease and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). He serves as and ad hoc reviewer for numerous journals and has accumulated over 100 peer review publications. He is a member of the American Psychological Association and Massachusetts Neurophysiological Society. Dr. Aloscowill be sharing updates in Dementia research. Susan Antkowiak is the Vice President of Programs and Services of the Alzheimer’s Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter. She currently serves on the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Treatment for the State of MA. She will be speaking on the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s and Dementia Act. Space is limited. To RSVP, contact the Alzheimer’s Association at 800-272-3900 or www.eventbrite.com/e/morning-fo-me-tickets-58746979798 For sponsorship opportunities contact Cynthia Hession-Richard a

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  Annual Health and Wellness Fair at the The Center at Punchard When: Thursday, May 16th 2019 from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm part of the Living Healthy Series by Andover Elder Services (AES) and the Andover Senior Community Friends (ASCF) The annual Health Fair will have over 30 vendors onsite who provide services focused on health and wellness. All are welcome to attend. Participants will learn a lot and receive FREE giveaways. Attend and receive FREE brown bag lunch.  

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May 1, 2019

Shortness of breath, fatigue, reduced ability to exercise, irregular heartbeat, congested lungs … these are just a few symptoms of heart failure. The worst part about it? Currently, there is no cure.

What is heart disease?

Heart Disease doesn’t refer to just one condition, rather it refers to a multitude of heart conditions such as heart attack, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, stroke and many more. It sounds deadly, but it actually doesn’t mean your heart has “stopped” or is about to stop working.

When living with heart disease, your heart does not pump blood and oxygen throughout the body the way that it should – this results in the symptoms you read above, and although it sounds like something that would be rare, it actually affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States.

Can anyone get heart disease? Are there risk factors?

Your health is important and the choices you make when it comes to diet, exercise and health screenings play a role. However, there are some risk factors that you can’t control. Let’s take a look at some of the factors:

  • Gender – males are typically at a greater risk than females
  • Age – the older you get, the higher the risk
  • Family History – if it runs in the family, you are more likely to get heart disease than someone who does not have a family history
  • Smoking
  • Uncontrolled Hypertension
  • Physical Inactivity

 

What can I do to lower my risk?

The less “entries” you have into the “Heart Disease” drawing, the better. Meaning you should limit as much of the risk factors that are in your control as possible.

Eat Healthy – Be mindful of what types of food you’re putting into your body. It doesn’t have to be boring to eat clean, find healthy recipes here.

Exercise – Exercise isn’t just for the pro-athletes. Incorporate a style of exercise that you enjoy and try to do it 30 minutes a day or a couple of days a week. You could try walking, swimming, a fitness class, sports or even dancing.

Limit Stress – Easier said than done, but it’s very important. Those with high levels of stress and anger are at greater risk of heart attacks and strokes. Find coping mechanisms or things to do that help you calm down during stress.

Monitor Your Health – If you already have medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, etc. make sure you are staying in a healthy range. Whether you have existing conditions or not, it’s always best to get an annual health screening.

Every FDA approval of new medicine starts with a medical research study, they are the key tools used to find better ways to treat and prevent medical conditions for today and the future. The providers at ActivMed Practices & Research, Inc. are currently enrolling for several clinical trials. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see how you or someone you love may qualify for a study, click HERE.

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AGE OF CHAMPIONS FREE Health Fair It’s never too soon to age well! Community Resources Vendors Demonstrations Health Assessments Hands-on Activities Giveaways   Center on Aging and Community Living Visit us at www.agingandcommunityliving.com April 27, 2019 Lundholm Gymnasium UNH, Durham

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Wednesday, April 24th 5:00 PM-7:00 PM Frisbie Memorial Hospital 11 Whitehall Road, Rochester, NH 03867 Join us for an open conversation with staff and volunteers from the Alzheimer’s Association as we connect individuals and families impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Learn about available resources, discover volunteer opportunities and share your experiences in an effort to bolster resources, programs and services to support families in the community.   Registration is requested. Light refreshments will be provided. 800.272.3900 alz.org/manh email Carrie: camorim@alz.org

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Parkinson’s and the Family Care Partner Session 1: Understanding Parkinson’s Disease and the Role of the Family Care Partner Presented by Stephanie Bissonnette, DO, MPH & Cathi A. Thomas, MS, RN, CNRN Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Boston University Medical Campus American Parkinson Disease Association Massachusetts Chapter and Information & Referral Center apdama.org | 800 651-8466 | apdama@apdaparkinson.org The American Parkinson Disease Association MA Chapter is pleased to present this educational program designed for the care partners of people with Parkinson’s. This session is the first in the monthly “Parkinson’s and the Family Care Partner: What You Need to Know” educational series. The program is presented in partnership with Assisting Hands Homecare and New Horizons at Choate, LLC. Space is limited and pre-registration is required for this free program. To learn more and to register, contact the APDA Information and Referral Center at 800-651-8466. Date & Time Tuesday, April 23, 2019| 1:00—2:30 PM Location New Horizons at Choate 21 Warren Avenue | Woburn, MA 01801

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April 22, 2019

ActivMed partnered with the Pentucket Players during their production of Mamma Mia! by providing free tickets to 75 area seniors.
Our CEO, Terry Stubbs was able to get a few minutes on stage and speak about Brain Health
and the importance of getting a Memory Screening

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Posted in Events
April 18, 2019

Our CEO, Terry Stubbs will be speaking at this year’s MAGI Clinical Research Conference 2019- East

May 5-8 in Boston, MA at the Sheraton Boston Hotel.

The conference will have:

100+ session and workshops in six tracks: clinical operations & project management, site management, regulatory compliance, contracts, budgets & billing, and special topics.

240+ speakers with diverse expertise and backgrounds.

22+ continuing education contact hours (CME, CNE, CCB, other)

Model Agreements & Guidelines International (MAGI) is streamlining clinical research by standardizing best practices for clinical operations, business and regulatory compliance.

ActivMed Practices & Research, Inc. is a proud MAGI Blue Ribbon Site- Chapter Member

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Posted in Events
April 18, 2019

Please Join Us!

Enjoy entertainment by local musicians, including organist Scott Ness and Mark Menery singing the best of Frank Sinatra. You will also learn how and why to keep your brain healthy and how you can participate in dementia research happening in our community.

Opportunities to ask questions and sign-up for a free memory screen will be available. Join us at the historic Methuen Memorial Music Hall for a night of music, song, and learning.

Lite refreshments will be served. Free parking available!

This event is free, but requires registration.

Please click here to register!

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Advance Care Planning is not reserved for those who are sick or elderly. Rather it is important for all those 18 years or older to begin the ongoing conversation with loved ones. Making your own choices regarding your healthcare decisions is the kindest gift you can give to your family. Join us for this bilingual presentation as Dr. Debra Turiano, MD and Dr. Sandra Cardena, MD share important information on what an advanced directive is, how to best use it and how to begin the conversation with your family. Included with the presentation will be the opportunity to ask questions related to healthcare options as well as receive free information packets on how to prepare a healthcare proxy and other important documents that best convey your wishes. Presentation is free and open to the public. NO RSVP REQUIRED. Any questions please contact Debbi Scionti at 987-620-1415 or email debora_scionti@mihcs.com  

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A community wide effort to support the health and wellness of Billerica’s residents through its mission to Engage, Educate, and Energize Stop by our table Saturday, April 13, 2019 at 10 AM Enter to win a raffle gift basket!   Billerica Elks 14 Webb Brook Rd, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821   It is hosted by the Billerica Lions Club, the Billerica Lodge of Elks, Billerica Council on Aging, Billerica Library, Billerica Recreation, Billerica Crossings, LifeCare Center of Merrimack Valley and Pure Haven by Shirley Smith  

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April 11, 2019

 

Nine out of 10 older people get their blood pressure checked when they visit their primary care doctors, and 73 percent are screened for hearing or vision loss. But what about problems with memory or thinking? Only 16 percent are asked about that.

Those are among the findings in a pair of surveys conducted by the Alzheimer’s Association and released last week. The results show that although Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia are common afflictions of old age, when it comes to detecting early symptoms, many doctors just don’t want to go there.

“Some people feel like there’s not much we can do for dementia,” said Dr. Erin E. Stevens, a geriatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital. Doctors hesitate to give a devastating diagnosis when they have no treatment to offer, she said.

In Massachusetts, that may start to change. Massachusetts General Hospital is developing a program to collaborate with primary care doctors in managing the illness. And a first-in-the-nation law passed last year requires all doctors, nurses, and physician assistants to get training in Alzheimer’s diagnosis and care.

The law is intended, in part, to address a shocking statistic from an earlier survey of Medicare beneficiaries: Half of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease have not been diagnosed, and half of those with a diagnosis have not been told about it. In addition to the training, the Massachusetts law requires physicians to disclose an Alzheimer’s diagnosis to the patient or family member.

These provisions reflect a growing recognition that even though Alzheimer’s is fatal, people can live with it for a decade or more — and much can be done to improve the quality of those years, especially if you start early.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, a condition involving loss of memory and other mental abilities to the point of interfering with daily life. Alzheimer’s probably results from a combination of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors that interact to different degrees in each patient.

The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 1 in 10 Americans age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s dementia.

The association surveyed 1,000 primary care physicians around the country and a representative sampling of 1,954 consumers age 65 or older. Nearly all primary care physicians — 94 percent — said they consider it important to assess all elderly patients for cognitive impairment, but only 47 percent say it’s their standard protocol.

Patients come in with a host of medical issues, and if they don’t exhibit cognitive problems or raise questions about their memory, the other health problems are likely to take up the whole visit, explained Dr. Blair Wardenburg Fosburgh, a Boston internist.

Additionally there’s no reliable easy-to-use screening tool for dementia, she said. Medicare pays for an hourlong annual wellness visit that is supposed to include a cognitive assessment, but requirements for assessments are vague, Fosburgh said.

And even if a cognitive problem in recognized, she said, “Sometimes you feel powerless to really do much.”

The few medications for Alzheimer’s merely slow the disease’s progression, but the effects are modest and they don’t work for everyone.

In the absence of treatment or cure, what patients and their families most need is help managing the illness day by day. But doctors don’t have those resources at their fingertips, nor the time or expertise to organize them.

Fosburgh is optimistic that will change soon for her practice, which is based at Massachusetts General Hospital.

The hospital plans to pilot a program in which a dementia-care team will be embedded in primary care practices at the hospital. When a doctor suspects dementia, he or she will turn to specialists in the office who can confirm the diagnosis and to social workers who can help patients and their families find and arrange the services they need.

Among the other findings in the survey:

 Nine out of 10 elderly patients say they trust their doctor to recommend testing for thinking or memory problems but, on average, the doctors assess just half of their senior patients.

 The most common reasons physicians gave for not assessing patients was the absence of symptoms or lack of time.

 A majority also said patients resist the idea.

People don’t like to hear bad news, said Jim Wessler, CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire chapter. But physicians also aren’t trained in diagnosing dementia and often don’t understand the value of doing so.

Wessler told of a physician frustrated that none of the medications he prescribed were reducing a patient’s high blood pressure. Not until he performed a cognitive screening did he realize his patient was forgetting to take the pills, and forgetting that he hadn’t taken them.

Dr. Brent P. Forester, chief of geriatric psychiatry at McLean Hospital, said that it’s important to screen for memory problems because they could be symptoms of illnesses that have nothing to do with dementia but should be treated, such as depression, vitamin deficiency, thyroid problems, or an infection.

Even if tests rule out other causes and the patient appears to have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, Forester said, knowing about it as soon as possible gives people an opportunity to make the most of their remaining faculties — perhaps traveling while they can still enjoy it — and to plan for how to manage what lies ahead.

But Dr. Malaz A. Boustani, professor of aging research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, said his research has found no benefit from cognitive assessments the way medicine is generally practiced. “Unfortunately the system is not ready for cognitive assessments at this time,” he said.

Conducting widespread cognitive screening would be like offering mammograms in a system with no ability to perform biopsies or administer chemotherapy, he said.

“I feel their pain. The primary care doctors, they don’t have the resources and they don’t have the time,” Boustani said.

Boustani works with a central Indiana health system that does have the resources. Eskenazi Health, which encompasses inpatient and outpatient settings, started a collaborative dementia-care program more than decade ago. Patients meet with a team to develop a care plan, which is continually adjusted over time.

The system trains and employs “community health workers,” who need only a high school degree. These workers meet with families, help them address any difficulties, constantly measure how well the family functions, and work to reduce stress on the family member responsible for caregiving.

The program, he said, results in better health and a higher quality of life — and saves money.

Felice J. Freyer can be reached at felice.freyer@globe.com.

 

FULL ARTICLE: https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/2019/03/10/most-doctors-don-screen-for-dementia-but-that-may-change-massachusetts/YeQBKU9xDhWxmNaAf1DPUP/story.html

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Sign Up Today for Free Six Week Workshop! Sponsored by Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley, Inc. Wednesday, April 10th- May 15th 2019 11:00am- 1:30pm Andover/North Andover YMCA 165 Haverhill St., Andover MA Lunch will be provided for 3 of the 6 sessions For More Info or To Register Please call Maria Arias at 978-946-1211 www.healthyliving4me.org

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The healthy living Center of Excellence My Life, My Health Sign up today for FREE Six Week Workshop! Sponsored by Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley, Inc.   My Life My Health- the Stanford University Chronic Disease Self-Management Program is for anyone living with an on-going medical condition like: Arthritis Cancer Chronic Back Pain Diabetes High Blood Pressure Parkinson’s Disease Asthma COPD Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Fibromyalgia Heart Disease Stroke…and more Chronic disease, pain and discomfort may limit activities you enjoy. Join the My Life, My Health workshop and start to live again! Learn to Eat well Control your pain Start and exercise program Handle stress and relax Increase your energy level Lunch will be provided for 3 of the 6 sessions For More Info or to Register Please call Maria Arias at 978.946.1211 www.healthyliving4me.org  

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April 8, 2019

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by patchy hair loss that can affect the scalp and body. According to the National Alopecia Areata Foundation, approximately 6.8 million people in the United States and 147 million worldwide have or will develop alopecia areata at some point in their lives. Alopecia is much more than just hair loss; it can cause severe emotional distress and have a huge impact on the quality of life of those affected. Let’s take a look at what it’s really like to live with alopecia.

Panic, Distress, Denial

When you first feel a bald spot on the back of your head, panic ensues. Grabbing a mirror and seeing a completely bare patch of white scalp can really mess with your head. You immediately begin looking for more bald spots. When you have alopecia, you will inevitably find them. This leads to emotional distress. You may call family members in for a second opinion and to seek comfort. You want to deny that anything could be wrong. You never want to admit that you could have a condition that is causing you to lose your hair.

Reality sets in: Getting to the root of cause

 Receiving an alopecia diagnosis can be hard to cope with, but there is a bright side to the situation. People with alopecia areata who have only a few patches of hair loss often experience a spontaneous, full recovery, without the need for treatment. [1] Alopecia is also not contagious and is not due to nerves.

Making Lifestyle Changes Along The Way

Sometimes alopecia is more severe. You may consider wearing a wig to help camouflage the bald spots. While this may bring on feelings of anxiety and self-consciousness, it’s important to remember that most people will never notice. Having confidence and a positive attitude can also help.

HOPE

Clinical trials offer an opportunity to try and help find a cure for conditions like alopecia areata. Physicians at ActivMed Practices & Research, Inc. are working diligently to help find potential new alopecia areata treatment options. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with alopecia, you may qualify to participate in a currently enrolling research study. Qualified candidates who participate will receive study-related care at no cost and receive compensation for travel. To learn more and see if you may qualify for a study enrolling in Portsmouth, NH CLICK HERE . To learn about our Beverly, MA study CLICK HERE

[1] https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/70956.php

 

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